MAT 150 Topic 5 Project 2 Lesson Plan GCU

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MAT 150 Topic 5 Project 2 Lesson Plan GCU

Design a lesson plan on one subject from Topic 3, 4 or 5 from the list that is provided by your instructor. Include the following:

  1. Overview: Write an introduction to the class activity. Include the purpose of the activity and desired outcome.
  2. Objectives: The objectives should be specific and measurable.
  3. Time: How long will the activity take when implemented in the classroom?
  4. Materials: Describe any materials that are needed to conduct the lesson.
  5. Activity: Provide a detailed description of the activity. Write all steps from the instruction of the assessment.

Your lesson plan may be in any form approved by the instructor.

GCU style is not required, but solid academic writing is expected.

Refer to “Lesson Plan Scoring Guide,” prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.

You are required to submit this assignment to LopesWrite. Refer to the  for assistance.

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Discuss: Drive and Running Behavior

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Discuss: Drive and Running Behavior

Discuss: Drive and Running Behavior

FIGURE 8.1 Intensity of Drive and Running Behavior. Effects of deprivation time on mean log time to run a 10-unit T maze for a water reward by water-deprived rats. Note the increase in running time immediately after the 22-2 hour shift and the decrease in running time after the 2-22 hour shift.

Source: From “The Effect of Drive Level on the Maze Performance of the White Rat” by B. Hillman et al., 1953, Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, 46, figure 1. Copyright 1953 by American Psychological Association. Reprinted by permission.

food on food-deprived days and to choose the alley leading to water on water-deprived days. Thus, hunger drive stimuli became associated with the location of food, and thirst drive stimuli became associated with the location of water. A third characteristic of drive is that it motivates the individual to behave in order to reduce its intensity. Hull considered drive to be unpleasant. In fact, he felt that “Bentham’s concept of pain is equated substantially to our own [Hull’s] concept of need” (Hull, 1952, p. 341). Recall from Chapter 2 that Bentham (1789/1970) is the utilitarian philosopher who claimed that people are under the governance of two masters: pain and pleasure. Humans are motivated to reduce drive—that is, to get rid of any painful or unpleasant feeling. Since drive is characterized as being painful, then the behavior that reduces it will be more likely to occur. Eating reduces an unpleasant hunger drive, and drinking reduces an unpleasant thirst drive. The importance of Hull’s drive con- cept is that drive motivates the voluntary behavior that restores homeostasis. Drive moti- vates an individual to reduce feelings of hunger, thirst, or internal temperature deviation, thus maximizing the conditions necessary for well-being and life.

Characteristics of Psychological Needs The definition of psychological needs parallels that of physiological needs since both center on the notion of a deficit. In the case of a psychological need, there is a deficit between a per- son’s desired or set point level and the current level of the matching incentive or behavior.

Chronic or Temporary Psychological Needs. Psychological needs are chronic if a per- son desires some incentive or behavior of which she is habitually deprived. For example, if

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Motivation: Biological, Psychological, and Environmental, Third Edition, by Lambert Deckers. Published by Allyn & Bacon. Copyright © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc.

C H A P T E R E I G H T / Drives, Needs, and Awareness 187

a person has a large appetite for social inclusion then she might be chronically unsatisfied if the current social environment does not provide enough social inclusion. A person might have an enduring need for cognition if she is consistently deprived of her daily opportunity to solve Sudoku or crossword puzzles. However, psychological needs can also be temporary and are aroused occasionally. In this case, it is as if psychological needs are preexisting but remain dormant until aroused by the appropriate stimulus situation. When aroused, the psy- chological need serves as a motive that reminds a person of the discrepancy between his current situation and a final desired state (McClelland et al., 1953). Redintegration describes the process by which a need is activated or restored (Murray, 1938). For example, a safety need is aroused or redintegrated when an unlighted parking lot late at night is discrepant from a person’s ideal level of lighting. The aroused safety need produces a hurried pace to reach one’s car and drive away. The need to achieve is activated or redintegrated by the sight of a textbook, reminding a student of the discrepancy between his current knowledge and the amount necessary to succeed on an exam. The resulting need state or achievement motive leads to studying a textbook to reduce the discrepancy. Stimuli activate, redinte- grate, or restore psychological needs because they have been associated with the arousal characteristics of needs in the past (McClelland et al., 1953). To illustrate, the presence of people arouses the need for affiliation, and textbooks arouse the need to achieve, because in the past these stimuli have been associated with feelings of affiliation and achievement.

Using Needs to Explain Behavior. A final consideration involves demonstrating the relationship between need intensity and need-satisfying behavior. Do people differ in their intensities of psychological needs? How is a person’s level of need intensity measured? These questions cannot be answered by measuring behavior that is instrumental in satis- fying the need, since this behavior could have resulted from other factors. For example, if a person’s residence hall room is neat and tidy, does that mean she has a high need for or- der (Murray, 1938)? Or could it be she is just expecting company or likes being able to find things easily? If the concept of need is used to explain behavior, then two steps are neces- sary: measuring need intensity and showing its relationship with behavior satisfying the need. First, psychologists measure need level with a valid scale or questionnaire. Just as the number on the bathroom scale reflects the amount a person weighs, the score on a need scale reflects the intensity of a need. Second, need scale scores must correlate with be- havior instrumental in satisfying the need. Thus, when need is high, there must be a greater amount of need-satisfying behavior than when need is low. For example, the greater a per- son’s measured need for affiliation, the more friends he visits and telephones (Lansing & Heyns, 1959). In the next few sections, we will examine how various psychological needs are measured and the relationship between specific needs and behavior.

Maslow’s Theory of Needs Are all needs equally important or are some more potent than others? One view is that there are categories of needs that differ in their potency to motivate behavior.

Abraham Maslow (1970) constructed a hierarchy of needs: physiological, safety, belongingness, esteem, and self-actualization. These needs are organized into five tiers whereby the lower tier of needs is more likely to be acted on first, followed by needs at higher tiers (see Figure 8.2). Notice that in ascending the hierarchy, needs have been

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Motivation: Biological, Psychological, and Environmental, Third Edition, by Lambert Deckers. Published by Allyn & Bacon. Copyright © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc.

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PSY382 Module 3 Assignment 2 -LASA 1 Treatment Plan for Jackie (Argosy)

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PSY382 Module 3 Assignment 2 -LASA 1 Treatment Plan for Jackie (Argosy)

Jackie, a 35-year-old Japanese-American woman, has recently felt depressed and isolated. She reports that over the past three months she has had frequent crying spells, trouble sleeping through the night, and difficulty in finding pleasure in the activities she used to enjoy. A few days ago, she visited her family doctor to rule out any underlying physical or medical problems that may be causing her depressive symptoms. None were found. Although some depressive symptoms were observed, the physician did not feel they were notable enough to require medication at the present time. The physician recommended that Jackie seek counseling services to alleviate her symptoms. Hence, Jackie has scheduled an appointment with you.

During her intake session, Jackie reports feeling depressed and tired on most days. After sustaining an injury to her right ankle eighteen months ago, she became sedentary. This resulted in weight gain of approximately twenty-five pounds. Although her ankle injury has healed, she no longer engages in the physical activity of playing tennis that she once enjoyed. She reports feeling out of shape and is reluctant to take up the sport due to her added weight. She has lost contact with her friends at the tennis club due to her lack of involvement in the sport and reports feeling isolated.

Jackie works at a local home improvement store, a job she used to enjoy. Due to her ankle injury, she no longer works at the cash register but is now at a desk in the back room documenting inventory.

Jackie has two children: a daughter who is ten, and a son who is thirteen. She had them when she was in her early twenties. Jackie reports that she was once very involved with her children’s lives. However, now she has limited energy and is rarely able to fully engage with them or their activities.

Jackie further explains that she wants relief from her depressive symptoms.

As Jackie’s mental health counselor, develop a recommendation of treatment that applies and justifies the use of the positive psychology model. Include the following parts in your recommendation of the treatment:

Part 1: General assessment of Jackie’s needs

  • Assess Jackie’s needs from a positive psychology viewpoint.

Part 2: Application of the five concepts of positive psychology as directed by Jackie’s current situation and desired changes

  • Include the following sections in this part:
    • Analyze the concept of the full-life (the pleasant life, the good life, the meaningful life) as it appears in Jackie’s situation. Be sure to clearly define each of these theories in addition to providing specific details from the case scenario.
    • Assess Jackie’s signature strengths and clearly explain how you assessed them with Jackie. Recommend signature strengths that are appropriate for Jackie and explain why they are important for her improvement.
    • Identify Jackie’s prior flow experiences and recommend flow activities that are appropriate for Jackie at this point. Make sure to explain the concept of flow.
    • Recommend specific positive activity interventions (PAI) for Jackie. Explain why these PAIs are most appropriate for Jackie.
    • Explain why change is difficult for people from a positive psychology perspective. Include a contrast of positive psychology concepts (focus on strengths) and psychopathology (focus on illness). Then, explain how positive psychology concepts assist in the change process. Use Jackie’s situation for examples.

Write a 4–5-page paper in Word format. Apply APA standards to citation of sources. Use the following file naming convention: LastnameFirstInitial_M3_A2.doc.

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BUS519 Project Risk Management Risk Workshop and Risk Register

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BUS519 Project Risk Management Risk Workshop and Risk Register

Note: The assignments in this course are a series of papers that are based on the same case, which is located in the XanEdu tab in the left-hand menu of your course. The assignments depend on one another.

Write an 8–10 page paper in which you:

Identify the required pre-workshop activities.

Prepare a risk workshop agenda based on the Sample Agenda for a First Risk Assessment/Two-Day Risk Workshop (Figure B-8 in Practical Project Risk Management). Include suggested time intervals for each activity and justify why each agenda item is relevant for this case.

Determine the top five threats in a risk register following the Sample Simplified Risk Register Format (Figure B-11 in Practical Project Risk Management). Include information from the case for each threat.

Justify the assignment of probability and impacts for each threat identified.

Document the top three opportunities in a risk register following the Sample Simplified Risk Register Format (Figure B-11 in Practical Project Risk Management). Include information from the case for each opportunity.

Justify the assignment of probability and impacts for each opportunity identified.

Use at least three quality resources in this assignment. Note: Wikipedia and similar websites do not qualify as quality resources.

This course requires the use of Strayer Writing Standards. For assistance and information, please refer to the Strayer Writing Standards link in the left-hand menu of your course. Check with your professor for any additional instructions.

The specific course learning outcome associated with this assignment is:

Create a risk register that assesses the probability of impacts for threats and opportunities and is informed by a risk workshop.

 

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Assignment: Two Peer Replies

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Assignment: Two Peer Replies

Assignment: Two Peer Replies

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Assignment: Two Peer Replies

In chapter 12 of your text there is a discussion of learning environments that are teacher-centered and those that are student-centered.

(a) After reading that section explain what you think is the best approach and what specific strategies you use do as a teacher to create that “best” learning environment.

(b) What are some examples of ways you do/could use teacher-centered approaches?

(c) What are some examples or student-centered learning strategies you have or could use.

Please include at least 3 paragraphs and respond to 2 peers.

Peer reply needed for discussion 1 J

Week 6 Discussion

Traditionally, the presentation of information in school has been teacher-centered.  This approach can be varied in the techniques and strategies used, but as a rule a teacher-centered approach involves lecture with teacher lead questioning followed by skills practice.  There is a large variety of possible lecturing techniques available within this approach.  The questioning used by the educator, as well as the skills practice, also have many options.  The common component of the teacher-centered approach is that the teacher is the clear leader and the students follow the lead.

Within the past 20 years or so the teacher-centered approach has been questioned and many classrooms have moved to a more student-centered approach.  This approach, also called constructivism, involves the students creating their own understanding of knowledge.  A student-centered approach allows for a wide variety of lessons and activities such as discovery learning, inquiry methods, and cooperative learning.  Lately, a student-centered approach relies heavily on the use of personal learning devices and expects students to learn and progress at their own pace.  The teacher is integral in creating a variety of meaningful and student-centered lessons, but the student has a significant role in the acquisition of knowledge.

Personally, I feel a combined approach is more effective.  I am most comfortable and capable in a teacher-centered lecture format involving active questioning and skills practice.  I believe this approach is especially needed in primary and middle grades.  I think students need to learn how to become learners through guided practice.  I believe the teacher-centered approach does offer many opportunities for activities where the students have options as well as opportunities for group or cooperative moments.  The teacher-centered approach does not need to solely be what is considered the tradition style of lecture and classwork.

I have been in a district for the past 15 years that has pushed the curriculum towards a student-centered approach.  In Science and Mathematics students complete lessons and units on Chromebooks.  The students work at their own pace with check-in assessments and rough timelines for completion.  Assignments are not graded, and students have the opportunity to complete assessments several times until mastery is demonstrated.  The teacher is a guide or facilitator. This approach does work well for some students, but many students do not learn well with this model.  Those who do are typically highly motivated, able to focus easily, and able to independently access and complete the lessons effectively.  I have witnessed some teachers realizing that this individualizing learning is not best for all students.  I have started seeing lessons where the teacher begins with a more traditional teacher-centered approach, and then using the Chromebooks to supplement the information and to offer possible extension activities.  I think this is an approach that I would be likely to use in a classroom.

I do not think either approach is the best.  I think a combination that offers teacher-centered presentation of information and questioning, coupled with varied opportunities for skill practice is most effective.  This approach allows for varied learning styles and will meet the needs of more students.

Peer reply needed for discussion 2

 

I definitely don’t think that one approach is necessarily “better” than the other. For years, the more traditional method was of course the teacher centered approach but recently, the modern classroom allows for students and teacher to share the same focus, implementing more collaboration, open communication and group work. However, as well all know, every student is different and they all learn best in their own way. Some students may thrive in groups as others may need that one on one teacher centered method. I feel as though both approaches are beneficial in the classroom.

When utilizing either approach, there are going to be pros and cons. With teacher-centered learning, I feel as though the classroom is much more structured. I think that in order to help students develop structure and maintain classroom management, you still need to have lessons that are teacher centered so the students don’t have, what they may see as, “total control” at all times. I think teacher centered approach is good for reading. The teacher reads a book and the students listen. I always got some much more out of a book when someone else read it rather than taking turns with other students reading out loud because I was able to sit back and focus better on what was being read rather than worrying about who was reading next or when my turn was. I also think that the teacher centered approach is important to use to measure your students’ individual progress. With constant student-centered learning you may not see when a certain student is be falling behind or struggling.

There are more pros as to cons when it comes to the student centered approach but as I mentioned before, it is still important to implement both. Student centered learning is a great for student development. Students are learning the material as well as learning how to communicate and collaborate well with others which is great for building social skills. As a future school counselor I will have a lot of one on one meetings but I will also have many group meetings where the student centered approach is vital. Students interacting with one another and sharing their feelings and emotions is a great way for students to learn from each other and build each other up. I love the concept of “centers” that school counselors use. Each month there is a certain topic that students work on, whether it be building self-confidence, dealing with anxiety, or how not to be a bully. Group activities are laid out around the room and each group will have so much time at each center. The groups will work together to complete the activity with open communication and team work rather than just sitting and listening to a lesson about the given topic.

Overall, I strongly believe that both approaches are needed in the classroom in order for every student to learn to their full potential.

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Assignment: Society Critical Commentary

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Synchronizing Karma: The Internalization

and Externalization of a Shared,

Personal Belief

Steven G. Carlisle

Abstract When people internalize cultural materials, they do not absorb them as passive recipients

but, rather, adapt and apply them in ways that satisfy personal needs while also expressing them in

ways acceptable to the community. It is not just a process of moving things into the individual but one of

synchronizing imaginings of experience. For Bangkok’s Buddhists, karma is a concept that is both cul-

turally shared and, often, deeply personal. Karmic experiences are understood individually and shared

through personal karmic narratives. A set of shared standards determines which stories can be accept-

ed as describing karmic experiences while also serving to shape the individual’s interpretations of those

experiences. Although social monitoring of interpretations of individual experiences makes belief in

karma acceptable, the intersection of abstract doctrine with personal interpretations gives the doctrine a

nearly undeniable veracity. Therefore, synchronized karmic beliefs thrive, despite Bangkok’s rapid de-

velopment and cultural change. Addressing dynamics of synchronization moves psychological

anthropology beyond frameworks of acquisition and internalization to considerations of negotiating

agency in the reproduction of culture. [Buddhism, internalization, karma, imagination, narrative]

Because people have different experiences, how is it that they can come to have beliefs that

are shared across the demographic spectrum of a society while also being deeply integrated

into their understandings of the workings of the worldFthoroughly believed to the point

that they can affect many of a person’s habits? That is, how are shared religious beliefs in-

ternalized? Although it may appear counterintuitive, for beliefs like karma, internalization

comes through processes relating to the formation of projective systems. The idea here is

not that people project thoughts and feelings out and that other people take them inFit is

that the rules that govern the projective system are negotiated publicly, and allow people

to synchronize their interpretations of personal experiences, creating the sense of a shared

experiential reality. Public karmic narratives sit at the nexus of abstract religious doctrines

that describe the nature of reality, personal experience, and the social sanctioning of inter-

pretations of those experiences. Social monitoring of karma narratives keeps karmic

interpretations of personal experience broadly acceptable and consistent while these per-

sonal experiences of karma give the doctrine a compelling veracity. At times, therefore, the

karmic order is accepted not because it satisfies people’s desires but because it appears ab-

solutely true. If deeply held beliefs grow out of shared negotiations, then perhaps we should

look at processes of synchronization, rather than internalization.

194 ETHOS

ETHOS, Vol. 36, Issue 2, pp. 194–219, ISSN 0091-2131 online ISSN 1548-1352. & 2008 by the American Anthropological Association. All rights reserved. DOI: 10.1111/j.1548-1352.2008.00011.x.

The ethnographic material here is drawn from participant-observation of and interviews

with middle-class Thai Buddhists, all of whom also expressed a belief in karma. Research for

this article took place over 30 months between 1999 and 2001. Subjects were ethnic Thai

Buddhists in their twenties, thirties, and early forties at the time; all were residents of

Bangkok; and all were members of the middle classes.1 The informant base includes, for

example, teachers, small merchants, and low- and mid-level executives. This work involved

more than two years of participant-observation, and extended ethnographic interviews with

approximately 20 subjects. Data include karma stories told by several dozen individuals, as

well as stories available in Thai public media since 1999. Interviews, conducted primarily in

Thai, were open-ended, but generally focused on questions concerning family life, morality,

love, and Buddhism. Although stories often arose during the natural course of discussions, a

few were solicited, after a subject had made it clear that he or she believed in karma. The

stories selected for this article were typical of the larger pool: especially among the young,

anecdotes that involved cruelty to animals were common, as were stories about repayment

for the sacrifices of elders.

Personal narratives are more than reports about reality. They embody theories about con-

nections between events (Bruner 1987; Capps and Ochs 1995). They do not just describe

things as they are, but participate in the production and affirmation of visions of reality.

Synchronized belief in karma is carried through narratives that follow negotiated guidelines.

What sorts of negotiations give rise to shared yet personal systems like karma? Some broad

restrictions on stories must apply if a projective system is to be able to allow information to

work along the two axes, the social–personal and the doctrinal–experiential. First, however,

it is necessary to sort out the type of karmic narrative that is relevant here. In addition to

occasional discussions of Buddhist doctrine, the subject of karma appears in conversation

in a number of different forms. Most commonly, people discuss their own experiences,

descriptions that often take a form like this: ‘‘I went to the temple and made an offering to a

monk [which is a source of good karma], and I felt good about it.’’ They occasionally make

vague references to one another’s karma, as when one struggling merchant announced that

another merchant, who had done well during the economic crisis of the late 1990s, had

succeeded because of his karma. What contributed to his good karma, however, and how,

exactly, it contributed to his success in business, remain unknown to the speaker. A third sort

of conversation about karma also takes place: one in which specific moral actions and karmic

responses are connected and described, often in great detail. This article will focus on this

sort of narrative, in which projections are clearly defined.

Such narratives constitute approximately half of the stories I gathered during the research,

and nearly all of the best-elaborated narratives.

The Bangkok-Thai Buddhist doctrine of karma is straightforward: good acts are always re-

warded, bad acts always punished, in proportion and in kind. Because of personal interest

and attention to cultural norms, many residents of Bangkok develop individual relationships

SYNCHRONIZING KARMA 195

with their karma, through a process of reification of projected information. The idea that

the universe at large is ordered is academic to them; what is of interest is not the universe’s

relationship to karma but their own. Because of individuals’ ability to project ideas onto the

universe, they perceive karma as more than a force of nature. Just as Weber’s Calvinists’

concerns led those subjects to think about the double-predestining God as personally sig-

nificant, thoughts about karmic retribution and reward lead many Thai Buddhists to think

about karma as an active presence in their own lives. This ranges from a mild but persistent

preoccupation, described by one person as a feeling of being unclean, to a life-shaping ob-

session. Chatri, in his early thirties, has shaped much of his life around his belief.2 He claims

that his planFwell underwayFis to commit his life to giving of himself, and to die without

accepting more than the minimum of gifts and kindnesses, so that in future incarnations he

will thrive. For many urban, middle-class Thai Buddhists, karma is not simply an ordering

principle; it is a force with which they interact, and with which they have personal relation-

ships. Karma helps order the universeFbut what matters in these cases is the fact that it

orders their lives in it.

Analysis of karma stories can go beyond general statements about a desire for order. In

this article, I examine personal anecdotes about karma in an effort to understand specific,

widely shared guidelines that shape that order, and the particular forms of engagement that

make karma both universal and personal, connecting Thai Buddhists not just to the uni-

verse, but, through socially shared experiences, to a view of the world that they share with

one another.

Context: Anthropological Literature and Theory

Many scholars have approached the topic of karma, but for the most part, they have not

explainedFand rarely examinedFkarma’s ability to take on deep personal significance.

Since Rhys Davids (1896) began to publish his work on Buddhism around the turn of the last

century, a variety of approaches have been taken in analyzing this phenomenon. The works

of K. N. Sharma (1997) and Gombrich (1996) take broadly historical and theological van-

tage points, whereas the contributions of others (E. Daniel 1983; S. Daniel 1983) rely on

contemporary source material for symbolic analyses and treatments of contemporary social

significance. Others (such as Lau 2001) take a psychological approach, looking at karma as a

response to needs and desires. About one thing, however, all analysts agree: karma works as a

bridging concept, one that spans the gap between the mundane and easily considered reali-

ties of daily life, and the great, abstract order of the universe. It is on this level, what Hiebert

calls the ‘‘transempirical’’ (1983:121) while also this-worldly, that explanations for karma

can be sought: it is seen both as experiential and as universal.

Karma poses a problem on the practical level. Although the idea that every moral action is

eventually met with an appropriate responseFa sort of ethical first law of thermodynamicsF

there is no way of knowing exactly what that response will be, or when it will come. Because

196 ETHOS

of the existential firewall that exists between incarnations, allowing karma to carry over from

one lifetime to the next while blocking out memories of the past, there is no way of har-

nessing knowledge about an individual’s karma for practical effect. No one can say with any

certainty what will happen, and, except in cases where one’s karma returns during the same

lifetime, why something will happen.

This may be why many of the anthropologists who have looked at karma report that it is

often an explanation of last resort. People generally rely on more clearly defined explana-

tions before falling back on karma (Babb 1983; Beck 1983). Hiebert (1983:120) reports that

his informants frequently attribute events to physics, fate, astrology, spirits, and the gods as

well as karma. Why, then, maintain the karmic tradition at all? Why is it that karma plays a

central role in ancient Vedic texts as well as contemporary television dramas?

Gombrich (1975:219) argues that karma’s golden-rule implications make it socially useful.

Keyes asserts that, although making merit results in good feelings, ‘‘it is not the state of

mind that is significant . . . but the social recognition of being a person of virtue’’ (1983:268).

He uses this conception to explain one of the central problems faced by anthropologists of

Buddhism: how to explain karma’s persistence among worldly populations. Karma can be

used as a basis for an ethical system among worldly Buddhists because of the ability to

transfer merit from one person to another (Keyes 1983:270)

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Assignment: Decision Tree for Neurological and Musculoskeletal Disorders NURS 6521

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Assignment: Decision Tree for Neurological and Musculoskeletal Disorders NURS 6521

Assignment: Decision Tree for Neurological and Musculoskeletal Disorders NURS 6521

For your Assignment, your Instructor will assign you one of the interactive media pieces provided in the Resources. As you examine the patient case studies in this module’s Resources, consider how you might assess and treat patients presenting symptoms of neurological and musculoskeletal disorders.

Assignment: Decision Tree for Neurological and Musculoskeletal Disorders

The case study depicts a 43-year-old white male who presents with a complaint of pain. He uses a set of clutches when ambulating. The patient reports that he has been referred for psychiatric assessment by his family doctor since the doctor perceived that he had psychological pain (Laureate Education, 2016). The pain began seven years ago after sustaining a fall and landed on the right hip. Four years ago, it was revealed that the cartilage around the right hip joint had a 75% tear.  However, no surgeon was willing to perform a total hip replacement since they believed that there would be tissue repair over time (Laureate Education, 2016). He reports having severe cramping of the right extremity. A neurologist diagnosed him with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). He states that he gets low moods at times but denies being depressed.  He had been prescribed with Hydrocone but used it in low doses due to drowsiness and constipation, and the drug does not manage pain effectively (Laureate Education, 2016). The mental status exam is unremarkable.

Decision Point One: Savella 12.5 mg orally once daily on Day 1, followed by 12.5 mg BD on Day 2 and 3, then 25 mg BD on days 4-7 and then 50 mg BD after that.

Reason: Savella is a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor that has NMDA antagonist activity, which brings analgesia at the nerve endings (Cording et al., 2015). It is indicated for fibromyalgia and thus effective for this client (Cording et al., 2015). I prescribed Savella to help in pain management and improve the overall mood.

Expected Result: I anticipated that Savella would lower the degree of pain. However, it was expected that the client would experience adverse effects such as nausea, constipation, headache, hot flushes, and insomnia.

Expected Vs. Actual Results: The client returned to the clinic after for weeks without using crutches but with a bit of limping. He states that the pain has been more manageable. The pain is severe in the morning but improves throughout the day (Laureate Education, 2016). On a scale of 1-10, the client rates the pain at four and states that he gets to a point on most days where he does not need crutches. Nevertheless, he reported having increased sweating, sleeping difficulties, nausea, and palpitations (Laureate Education, 2016). His BP was 147/92, and the pulse at 110. He denied having suicidal ideations and was still future-oriented.

Decision Point 2: Continue with Savella but lower dose to 25 mg twice a day.

Reason: I selected this decision to lower the severity of the adverse effects of Savella, which include nausea, constipation, headache, hot flushes, and insomnia (Cording et al., 2015).

Expected Result: Reduction in the dose of Savella would help control the side effects but lower the degree of pain control.

Expected Vs. Actual Results: The client returned to the clinic in four weeks using crutches and rates his current pain at 7/10. He reports that his condition has declined since the previous month (Laureate Education, 2016). He states that he sleeps at night but frequently wakes up due to pain in the right leg and foot. The BP is at 124/87 and pulse at 87. He denies having palpitations and suicidal ideations but is discouraged by the slip in pain management and seems sad.

Decision Point 3: Change Savella to 25 mg in the morning and 50 mg at Bedtime.

I reduced the dosage in the morning since the pain is mostly under control and increased the dose at Bedtime when there is less control (Resmini et al., 2015).

Expected Result: By lowering the morning dose and increasing the bedtime dose, I expected that the client’s pain symptom would improve while at the same time controlling the side effects of Savella (Resmini et al., 2015).

Expected Vs. Actual Results: The client reported an improvement in the pain with a rate of 3/10 denied having any side effects from the drug.

References

Cording, M., Derry, S., Phillips, T., Moore, R. A., & Wiffen, P. J. (2015). Milnacipran for pain in fibromyalgia in adults. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (10).

Laureate Education. (2016). Case Study: A Caucasian man with hip pain. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Resmini, G., Ratti, C., Canton, G., Murena, L., Moretti, A., & Iolascon, G. (2015). Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome. Clinical cases in mineral and bone metabolism: the official journal of the Italian Society of Osteoporosis, Mineral Metabolism, and Skeletal Diseases12(Suppl 1), 26–30.

Photo Credit: KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY / Science Photo Library / Getty Images

To Prepare

Review the interactive media piece assigned by your Instructor.
Reflect on the patient’s symptoms and aspects of the r presented in the interactive media piece.
Consider how you might assess and treat patients presenting with the symptoms of the patient case study you were assigned.
You will be asked to make three decisions concerning the diagnosis and treatment for this patient. Reflect on potential co-morbid physical as well as patient factors that might impact the patient’s diagnosis and treatment.
By Day 7 of Week 8

Write a 1- to 2-page summary paper that addresses the following:

Briefly summarize the patient case study you were assigned, including each of the three decisions you took for the patient presented.
Based on the decisions you recommended for the patient case study, explain whether you believe the decisions provided were supported by the evidence-based literature. Be specific and provide examples. Be sure to support your response with evidence and references from outside resources.
What were you hoping to achieve with the decisions you recommended for the patient case study you were assigned? Support your response with evidence and references from outside resources.
Explain any difference between what you expected to achieve with each of the decisions and the results of the decision in the exercise. Describe whether they were different. Be specific and provide examples.
You will submit this Assignment in Week 8.

Submission and Grading Information

To submit your completed Assignment for review and grading, do the following:

Please save your Assignment using the naming convention “WK8Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” as the name.
Click the Week 8 Assignment Rubric to review the Grading Criteria for the Assignment.
Click the Week 8 Assignment link. You will also be able to “View Rubric” for grading criteria from this area.
Next, from the Attach File area, click on the Browse My Computer button. Find the document you saved as “WK8Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” and click Open.
If applicable: From the Plagiarism Tools area, click the checkbox for I agree to submit my paper(s) to the Global Reference Database.
Click on the Submit button to complete your submission.
Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:

Week 8 Assignment Rubric

Check Your Assignment Draft for Authenticity

To check your Assignment draft for authenticity:

Submit your Week 8 Assignment draft and review the originality report.

Submit Your Assignment by Day 7 of Week 8

To participate in this Assignment:

Week 8 Assignment

What’s Coming Up in Week 7?

 

Photo Credit: [BrianAJackson]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images

Next week, you will continue working on your Assignment started in Week 6, and you will complete your Midterm Exam.

Next Week

To go to the next week:

Week 7

Week 7: Midterm Exam
This week, you will continue working on your Assignment started in Week 6, and you will complete your Midterm Exam.

Learning Objectives
Students will:

Identify key terms, concepts, and principles related to prescribing drugs to treat patient disorders

Midterm Exam
The Exam covers the content you have explored throughout the first 6 weeks of this course.

This exam is a test of your knowledge in preparation for your certification exam. No outside resources—including books, notes, websites, or any other type of resource—are to be used to complete this quiz. You are not allowed to take screenshots or record the exam questions in any other format while taking the exam. You are expected to comply with Walden University’s Code of Conduct.

 

Photo Credit: Getty Images/Hero Images

By Day 7 of Week 7
Complete the Midterm Exam. You have 120 minutes to complete the exam. You may only attempt this exam once.

Submission and Grading Information
Complete the Exam by Day 7 of Week 7

To Complete this Exam:

Week 7 Exam

 

What’s Coming Up in Module 6?

Photo Credit: [BrianAJackson]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images

In the next module, you will examine types of drugs prescribed to patients who present with psychological disorders.

In the next module, you will examine types of drugs prescribed to patients who present with psychological disorders.

Next Week

To go to the next week:

Module 6

 

Module 6: Psychological Disorders
Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act…mental health is important at every stage of life, from childhood and adolescence through adulthood.

—Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2018

As an advanced practice nurse, treating patients who may present with psychological disorders requires critical clinical decision making. It is your expertise in clinical decision making that will ensure that the pharmacotherapeutics and other suggested treatments prescribed to your patients will not only promote positive patient health outcomes but will lead to sustained health and well-being.

Reference: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2018). Mental health. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/mentalhealth/index.htm

What’s Happening This Module?
Module 6: Psychological Disorders is a 1-week module, Week 8 of the course. In this module, you will examine types of drugs prescribed to patients with psychological disorders. You also examine potential impacts of pharmacotherapeutics used to treat psychological disorders on a patient’s pathophysiology.

What do I have to do?
When do I have to do it?
Review your Learning Resources
Days 1-7, Week 8
Discussion: Decision Making When Treating Psychological Disorders
Post by Day 3 of Week 8, and respond to your colleagues by Day 6 of Week 8.
Assignment: Decision Tree for Neurologic and Musculoskeletal Disorders
Submit your Assignment by Day 7 of Week 8.
Go to the Week’s Content

Week 8

Week 8: Pharmacology for Psychological Disorders
How does an advanced practice nurse determine the best treatment option or pharmacotherapeutic to recommend for patients with psychological disorders?

Much like assessing or recommending pharmacotherapeutics for other conditions or disorders, as an advanced practice nurse, you may encounter a patient who presents with a psychological disorder. Understanding the guiding principles related to treating patients with psychological disorders as well as the effects of pharmacotherapeutics on a patient’s overall health and well-being is critical for the safe and effective delivery of care.

This week, you examine types of drugs prescribed to patients with psychological disorders. You also examine potential impacts of pharmacotherapeutics used to treat psychological disorders on a patient’s pathophysiology.

Learning Objectives
Students will:

Evaluate patients for treatment of psychological disorders
Analyze decisions made throughout the diagnosis and treatment of patients with psychological disorders
Analyze impacts of pharmacotherapeutics for psychological disorders on patient pathophysiology
Evaluate patients for treatment of neurological and musculoskeletal disorders
Analyze decisions made throughout the diagnosis and treatment of patients with neurological and musculoskeletal disorders
Justify decisions made throughout the diagnosis and treatment of patients with neurological and musculoskeletal disorders

Learning Resources

Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)

Rosenthal, L. D., & Burchum, J. R. (2021). Lehne’s pharmacotherapeutics for advanced practice nurses and physician assistants (2nd ed.) St. Louis, MO: Elsevier.

Chapter 26, “Antipsychotic Agents and Their Use in Schizophrenia” (pp. 203–213)
Chapter 27, “Antidepressants” (pp. 214–226)
Chapter 28, “Drugs for Bipolar Disorder” (pp. 228–233)
Chapter 29, “Sedative-Hypnotic Drugs” (pp. 234–242)
Chapter 30, “Management of Anxiety Disorders” (pp. 243–247)
Chapter 31, “Central Nervous System Stimulants and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder” (pp. 248–254)

Required Media (click to expand/reduce)

 

Laureate Education (Producer). (2019a). Adult geriatric depression [Interactive media file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

 

In this interactive media piece, you will engage in a set of decisions for prescribing and recommending pharmacotherapeutics to treat adult geriatric depression.

Laureate Education (Producer). (2019c). Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder [Interactive media file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

 

In this interactive media piece, you will engage in a set of decisions for prescribing and recommending pharmacotherapeutics to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Laureate Education (Producer). (2019d). Bipolar therapy [Interactive media file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

 

In this interactive media piece, you will engage in a set of decisions for prescribing and recommending pharmacotherapeutics for bipolar therapy.

Laureate Education (Producer). (2019g). Generalized anxiety disorder [Interactive media file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

 

In this interactive media piece, you will engage in a set of decisions for prescribing and recommending pharmacotherapeutics to treat generalized anxiety disorder.

Week 6: Neurologic and Musculoskeletal Disorders and Opioids

Sabrina is a 26 year old female who has just been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. She has scheduled an appointment for a follow up with her physician but has several questions about her diagnosis and is calling the Nurse Helpline for her hospital network. As she talks with the advanced practice nurse, she learns that her diagnosis also impacts her neurologic and musculoskeletal systems. Although multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disorder, both the neurologic and musculoskeletal systems will be affected by adverse symptoms that Sabrina needs to be aware of and for which specific drug therapy plans and other treatment options need to be decided on.

As an advanced practice nurse, what types of drugs will best address potential neurologic and musculoskeletal symptoms Sabrina might experience?

This week, you will evaluate patients for the treatment of neurologic and musculoskeletal disorders by focusing on specific patient case studies through a decision tree exercise. You will analyze the decisions you will make in the decision tree exercise and reflect on your experiences in proposing the recommended actions to address the health needs in the patient case study.

Learning Objectives

Students will:

  • Evaluate patients for treatment of neurologic and musculoskeletal disorders
  • Analyze decisions made throughout the diagnosis and treatment of patients with neurologic and musculoskeletal disorders
  • Justify decisions made throughout the diagnosis and treatment of patients with neurologic and musculoskeletal disorders

Learning Resources

Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)

Rosenthal, L. D., & Burchum, J. R. (2021). Lehne’s pharmacotherapeutics for advanced practice nurses and physician assistants (2nd ed.) St. Louis, MO: Elsevier.

  • Chapter 11, “Basic Principles of Neuropharmacology” (pp. 67–71)
  • Chapter 12, “Physiology of the Peripheral Nervous System” (pp. 72–81)
  • Chapter 12, “Muscarinic Agonists and Cholinesterase Inhibitors” (pp. 82–89)
  • Chapter 14, “Muscarinic Antagonists” (pp. 90-98)
  • Chapter 15, “Adrenergic Agonists” (pp. 99–107)
  • Chapter 16, “Adrenergic Antagonists” (pp. 108–119)
  • Chapter 17, “Indirect-Acting Antiadrenergic Agents” (pp. 120–124)
  • Chapter 18, “Introduction to Central Nervous System Pharmacology” (pp. 125–126)
  • Chapter 19, “Drugs for Parkinson Disease” (pp. 127–142)
  • Chapter 20, “Drugs for Alzheimer Disease” (pp. 159–166)
  • Chapter 21, “Drugs for Seizure Disorders” (pp. 150–170)
  • Chapter 22, “Drugs for Muscle Spasm and Spasticity” (pp. 171–178)
  • Chapter 24, “Opioid Analgesics, Opioid Antagonists, and Nonopioid Centrally Acting Analgesics” (pp. 183–194)
  • Chapter 59, “Drug Therapy of Rheumatoid Arthritis” (pp. 513–527)
  • Chapter 60, “Drug Therapy of Gout” (pp. 528–536)
  • Chapter 61, “Drugs Affecting Calcium Levels and Bone Mineralization” (pp. 537–556)
Required Media (click to expand/reduce)

Laureate Education (Producer). (2019b). Alzheimer’s disease [Interactive media file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

 

In this interactive media piece, you will engage in a set of decisions for prescribing and recommending pharmacotherapeutics to treat Alzheimer’s disease.

Laureate Education (Producer). (2019e). Complex regional pain disorder [Interactive media file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

 

In this interactive media piece, you will engage in a set of decisions for prescribing and recommending pharmacotherapeutics to treat complex regional pain disorders.

Disorders of The Nervous System

Reflect on the comprehensive review of disorders of the nervous system and think about how you might recommend or prescribe pharmacotherapeutics to treat these disorders. (15m)

 

Speed Pharmacology. (2019). Drugs for Parkinson’s Disease (Made Easy) [Video]. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z84iypHdftQ&t=13s
Note:
This media program is approximately 9 minutes.

Speed Pharmacology. (2019). Pharmacology- Drugs for Alzheimer’s Disease (Made Easy) [Video]. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=euzRPrvrwj0&t=31s
Note:
This media program is approximately 7 minutes.

Rubric Detail

Select Grid View or List View to change the rubric’s layout.

Name: NURS_6521_Week8_Assignment_Rubric
Grid View
List View
Excellent Good Fair Poor
Briefly summarize the patient case study you were assigned, including each of the three decisions you took for the patient presented. Be specific.
18 (18%) – 20 (20%)
The response accurately and thoroughly summarizes in detail the patient case study assigned, including specific and complete details on each of the three decisions made for the patient presented.
16 (16%) – 17 (17%)
The response accurately summarizes the patient case study assigned, including details on each of the three decisions made for the patient presented.
14 (14%) – 15 (15%)
The response inaccurately or vaguely summarizes the patient case study assigned, including details on each of the three decisions made for the patient presented.
0 (0%) – 13 (13%)
The response inaccurately and vaguely summarizes the patient case study assigned, including details on each of the three decisions made for the patient presented, or is missing.
Based on the decisions you recommended for the patient case study, explain whether you believe the decisions provided were supported by the evidence-based literature. Be specific and provide examples. Be sure to support your response with evidence and references from outside resources.
23 (23%) – 25 (25%)
The response accurately and thoroughly explains in detail how the decisions recommended for the patient case study are supported by the evidence-based literature.

The response includes specific and relevant outside reference examples that fully support the explanation provided.
20 (20%) – 22 (22%)
The response accurately explains how the decisions recommended for the patient case study are supported by the evidence-based literature.

The response includes relevant outside reference examples that lend support for the explanation provided that are accurate.
18 (18%) – 19 (19%)
The response inaccurately or vaguely explains how the decisions recommended for the patient case study are supported by the evidence-based literature.

The response includes inaccurate or vague outside reference examples that may or may not lend support for the explanation provided or are misaligned to the explanation provided.
0 (0%) – 17 (17%)
The response inaccurately and vaguely explains how the decisions recommended for the patient case study are supported by the evidence-based literature, or is missing.

The response includes inaccurate and vague outside reference examples that do not lend support for the explanation provided, or is missing.
What were you hoping to achieve with the decisions you recommended for the patient case study you were assigned? Support your response with evidence and references from outside resources.
18 (18%) – 20 (20%)
The response accurately and thorough explains in detail what they were hoping to achieve with the decisions recommend for the patient case study assigned.

The response includes specific and relevant outside reference examples that fully support the explanation provided.
16 (16%) – 17 (17%)
The response accurately explains what they were hoping to achieve with the decisions recommended for the patient case study assigned.

The response includes relevant outside reference examples that lend support for the explanation provided that are accurate.
14 (14%) – 15 (15%)
The response inaccurately or vaguely explains what they were hoping to achieve with the decisions recommended for the patient case study assigned.

The response includes inaccurate or vague outside reference examples that may or may not lend support for the explanation provided or are misaligned to the explanation provided.
0 (0%) – 13 (13%)
The response inaccurately and vaguely explains what they were hoping to achieve with the decisions recommended for the patient case study assigned, or is missing.

The response includes inaccurate and vague outside reference examples that do not lend support for the explanation provided, or is missing.
Explain any difference between what you expected to achieve with each of the decisions and the results of the decisions in the exercise. Describe whether they were different. Be specific and provide examples.
18 (18%) – 20 (20%)
The response accurately and clearly explains in detail any differences between what they expected to achieve with each of the decisions and the results of the decisions in the exercise.

The response provides specific, accurate, and relevant examples that fully support whether there were differences between the decisions made and the decisions available in the exercise.
16 (16%) – 17 (17%)
The response accurately explains any differences between what they expected to achieve with each of the decisions and the results of the decisions in the exercise.

The response provides accurate examples that support whether there were differences between the decisions made and the decisions available in the exercise.
14 (14%) – 15 (15%)
The response inaccurately or vaguely explains any differences between what they expected to achieve with each of the decisions and the results of the decisions in the exercise.

The response provides inaccurate or vague examples that may or may not support whether there were differences between the decisions made and the decisions available in the exercise.
0 (0%) – 13 (13%)
vaguely explains in detail any differences between what they expected to achieve with each of the decisions and the results of the decisions in the exercise, or is missing.

The response provides inaccurate and vague examples that do not support whether there were differences between the decisions made and the decisions available in the exercise, or is missing.
Written Expression and Formatting – Paragraph Development and Organization:
Paragraphs make clear points that support well developed ideas, flow logically, and demonstrate continuity of ideas. Sentences are carefully focused–neither long and rambling nor short and lacking substance.
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity.
4 (4%) – 4 (4%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 80% of the time.
3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 60%–79% of the time.
0 (0%) – 3 (3%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity less than 60% of the time.
Written Expression and Formatting – English writing standards:
Correct grammar, mechanics, and proper punctuation
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Uses correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation with no errors
4 (4%) – 4 (4%)
Contains a few (1–2) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors
3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)
Contains several (3–4) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors
0 (0%) – 3 (3%)
Contains many (≥ 5) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors that interfere with the reader’s understanding
Written Expression and Formatting – The paper follows correct APA format for title page, headings, font, spacing, margins, indentations, page numbers, running head, parenthetical/in-text citations, and reference list.
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Uses correct APA format with no errors
4 (4%) – 4 (4%)
Contains a few (1–2) APA format errors
3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)
Contains several (3–4) APA format errors
0 (0%) – 3 (3%)
Contains many (≥ 5) APA format errors
Total Points: 100
Name: NURS_6521_Week8_Assignment_Rubric

NURS_6521_Week8_Assignment_Rubric

Excellent Good Fair Poor
Briefly summarize the patient case study you were assigned, including each of the three decisions you took for the patient presented. Be specific.
Points Range: 18 (18%) – 20 (20%)
The response accurately and thoroughly summarizes in detail the patient case study assigned, including specific and complete details on each of the three decisions made for the patient presented.
Points Range: 16 (16%) – 17 (17%)
The response accurately summarizes the patient case study assigned, including details on each of the three decisions made for the patient presented.
Points Range: 14 (14%) – 15 (15%)
The response inaccurately or vaguely summarizes the patient case study assigned, including details on each of the three decisions made for the patient presented.
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 13 (13%)
The response inaccurately and vaguely summarizes the patient case study assigned, including details on each of the three decisions made for the patient presented, or is missing.
Based on the decisions you recommended for the patient case study, explain whether you believe the decisions provided were supported by the evidence-based literature. Be specific and provide examples. Be sure to support your response with evidence and references from outside resources.
Points Range: 23 (23%) – 25 (25%)

The response accurately and thoroughly explains in detail how the decisions recommended for the patient case study are supported by the evidence-based literature.

The response includes specific and relevant outside reference examples that fully support the explanation provided.

Points Range: 20 (20%) – 22 (22%)

The response accurately explains how the decisions recommended for the patient case study are supported by the evidence-based literature.

The response includes relevant outside reference examples that lend support for the explanation provided that are accurate.

Points Range: 18 (18%) – 19 (19%)

The response inaccurately or vaguely explains how the decisions recommended for the patient case study are supported by the evidence-based literature.

The response includes inaccurate or vague outside reference examples that may or may not lend support for the explanation provided or are misaligned to the explanation provided.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 17 (17%)

The response inaccurately and vaguely explains how the decisions recommended for the patient case study are supported by the evidence-based literature, or is missing.

The response includes inaccurate and vague outside reference examples that do not lend support for the explanation provided, or is missing.

What were you hoping to achieve with the decisions you recommended for the patient case study you were assigned? Support your response with evidence and references from outside resources.
Points Range: 18 (18%) – 20 (20%)

The response accurately and thorough explains in detail what they were hoping to achieve with the decisions recommend for the patient case study assigned.

The response includes specific and relevant outside reference examples that fully support the explanation provided.

Points Range: 16 (16%) – 17 (17%)

The response accurately explains what they were hoping to achieve with the decisions recommended for the patient case study assigned.

The response includes relevant outside reference examples that lend support for the explanation provided that are accurate.

Points Range: 14 (14%) – 15 (15%)

The response inaccurately or vaguely explains what they were hoping to achieve with the decisions recommended for the patient case study assigned.

The response includes inaccurate or vague outside reference examples that may or may not lend support for the explanation provided or are misaligned to the explanation provided.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 13 (13%)

The response inaccurately and vaguely explains what they were hoping to achieve with the decisions recommended for the patient case study assigned, or is missing.

The response includes inaccurate and vague outside reference examples that do not lend support for the explanation provided, or is missing.

Explain any difference between what you expected to achieve with each of the decisions and the results of the decisions in the exercise. Describe whether they were different. Be specific and provide examples.
Points Range: 18 (18%) – 20 (20%)

The response accurately and clearly explains in detail any differences between what they expected to achieve with each of the decisions and the results of the decisions in the exercise.

The response provides specific, accurate, and relevant examples that fully support whether there were differences between the decisions made and the decisions available in the exercise.

Points Range: 16 (16%) – 17 (17%)

The response accurately explains any differences between what they expected to achieve with each of the decisions and the results of the decisions in the exercise.

The response provides accurate examples that support whether there were differences between the decisions made and the decisions available in the exercise.

Points Range: 14 (14%) – 15 (15%)

The response inaccurately or vaguely explains any differences between what they expected to achieve with each of the decisions and the results of the decisions in the exercise.

The response provides inaccurate or vague examples that may or may not support whether there were differences between the decisions made and the decisions available in the exercise.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 13 (13%)

vaguely explains in detail any differences between what they expected to achieve with each of the decisions and the results of the decisions in the exercise, or is missing.

The response provides inaccurate and vague examples that do not support whether there were differences between the decisions made and the decisions available in the exercise, or is missing.

Written Expression and Formatting – Paragraph Development and Organization:
Paragraphs make clear points that support well developed ideas, flow logically, and demonstrate continuity of ideas. Sentences are carefully focused–neither long and rambling nor short and lacking substance.
Points Range: 5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity.
Points Range: 4 (4%) – 4 (4%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 80% of the time.
Points Range: 3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 60%–79% of the time.
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 3 (3%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity less than 60% of the time.
Written Expression and Formatting – English writing standards:
Correct grammar, mechanics, and proper punctuation
Points Range: 5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Uses correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation with no errors
Points Range: 4 (4%) – 4 (4%)
Contains a few (1–2) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors
Points Range: 3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)
Contains several (3–4) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 3 (3%)
Contains many (≥ 5) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors that interfere with the reader’s understanding
Written Expression and Formatting – The paper follows correct APA format for title page, headings, font, spacing, margins, indentations, page numbers, running head, parenthetical/in-text citations, and reference list.
Points Range: 5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Uses correct APA format with no errors
Points Range: 4 (4%) – 4 (4%)
Contains a few (1–2) APA format errors
Points Range: 3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)
Contains several (3–4) APA format errors
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 3 (3%)
Contains many (≥ 5) APA format errors
Total Points: 100
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Assignment: Late adulthood challenges

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Assignment: Late adulthood challenges

Assignment: Late adulthood challenges

A common goal for aging adults is to feel satisfied with a life well-lived and have the opportunity to savor the “golden years”.  Counselors working with older clients may help increase health and resilience by using self-reflection interventions.  One self-reflection technique is conduction a life review (Laureate Education, 2013b).  According to Dr. Donna Sheperis (Laureate Education, 2013b), a life review can guide clients through collecting artifacts and memories that are meaningful to the client.  The life review process could benefit both Miguel and Jeanette.  For Jeanette, the process may increase the pride she has as a mother and provide a tangible memoir she can pass on to her children and grandchildren.  For Miguel, the life review can serve as a reminder of obstacles he has overcome in his life.  Miguel might gain a new perspective in which he can feel free to explore his curiosity and respect Jeanette’s contentment with her desires.

Summary

Miguel and Jeanette Martinez have overcome many obstacles in their life.  They both hope to enjoy this period in life.  A life review may provide valuable insight into regrets.  At this point, Miguel would benefit from a new interpretation of past events.  People who come to terms with regret report high life -satisfaction and positive mood than people who do not come to terms with regret (Torges, Stewart, Miner-Rubino, 2005).

References

Broderick, P. C., & Blewitt, P. (2015). The life span: Human development for helping professionals (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education

Laureate Education (Producer). (2013a). [Video file]. Retrieved from CDN Files Database. (COUN 6215/COUN 8215/HUMN 8215)

Laureate Education (Producer). (2013b). Perspectives: The golden years [Video file]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu

Torges, C.M., Stewart, A.J., & Miner-Rubino, K. (2005).  Personality after the prime of life: men and women coming to terms with regrets.  Journal of Research in Personality, 39(1), 148-165.  Doi: 10.1016/i.irp.2004.09.005

3. (L. Waf)

Audrey Anderson now 72-years-old has presented for therapy at the request of her grandchildren following her husband Ernie’s sudden death two months ago of a heart attack. Audrey has not been eating or sleeping well nor has she been leaving her house. Audrey reports being well; stating, she misses her husband and wishes her grandchildren resided closer. As the conversation continued, Audrey reported two of her close friends from church have also passed away within the last year. She sighs and says, “Sure, I am lonely, but I know I will be with Ernie and my Holy Father soon.” (Laureate, 2013d).

Permalink:

Developmental Factors in Late Adulthood

Late adulthood is considered to begin around age 65. Developmental changes in late adulthood include cognitive, physical, and socioeconomic. Late adulthood is a sincerely problematic state with lots of grief and frustration.   (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015). Some physical changes associated with later adulthood include a decline in sensory capacity; declines in heart, kidney, lung, and muscle function; as well as memory degeneration, changes in appearance, and sensory changes. Other physical health conditions vary and are often attributed to health habits, hereditary factors, and other influences. These health conditions include cancer, dementia, heart disease, and arthritis. Cognitive changes include declines in reasoning, the speed of processing, and memory that are often associated with the primary biological changes that occur. Socioeconomic changes include changes in work status or loss of a spouse. Retirement brings about shifting roles in the home and social system.

Protective Factors for Late Adulthood Challenges

The protective factor I would use for Audrey is to encourage social connectedness by encouraging more involvement in her church. Religious involvement reduces the risk of depression in late adulthood. (George, Ellison, & Larson, 2001). I would also encourage grief counseling. “There’s a big difference between being depressed and being sad,” she says. “When we grieve, sadness overtakes us and rules our life for quite a while. However, there is movement. Eventually, we move through sadness and make meaning out of our loss.” (Kennedy, 2008). This quote speaks volumes to me about the grieving process. With proper empathy, support, guidance Audrey can efficiently work through her feelings of grief and learn to live with her loss.

References

Broderick, P. C., & Blewitt, P. (2015). The life span: Human development for helping professionals (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

George LK, Ellison CG, Larson DB. Explaining the relationships between religious involvement and health. Psychol. Inq. 2002;13:190–200

Kennedy, A. (2008). Working through grief. Retrieved from

Readings

· Broderick, P. C., & Blewitt, P. (2015). The life span: Human development for helping professionals (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

o Chapter 15, “Gains and Losses in Late Adulthood” (pp. 556-596)

Bielak, A. A. M., Anstey, K. J., Christensen, H., & Windsor, T. D. (2012). Activity engagement is related to level, but not change in cognitive ability across adulthood. Psychology and Aging, 27(1), 219–228.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Bowling, A, (2007). Aspirations for older age in the 21st century: What is successful aging? The International Journal of Aging & Human Development, 64(3), 263–297.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Davis, C. S. (2008). A funeral liturgy: Death rituals as symbolic communication. Journal of Loss and Trauma, 13(5), 406–421.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Hemmingson, M. (2009). Anthropology of the memorial: Observations and reflections on American cultural rituals associated with death. Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 10(3), 1–13.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Lowis, M. J., Edwards, A. C., & Burton, M. (2009). Coping with retirement: Wellbeing, health, and religion. Journal of Psychology, 143(4), 427–448.

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NURS 680B Advanced Health/Physical Assessment Week 8 Assignment Comprehensive Physical Exam (Shadow Health)

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NURS 680B Advanced Health/Physical Assessment

Week 8 Assignment

Comprehensive Physical Exam (Shadow Health)

This Comprehensive Assessment (Capstone) assignment provides you the opportunity to plan and conduct a full comprehensive health assessment on a patient in a single clinic visit. You will move through both the subjective and objective assessment in a head to toe order.

In this final comprehensive Shadow Health assignment, you will:

Interview your digital patient, Tina Jones within Shadow Health. She will be presenting for a pre-employment physical. You will be conducting a comprehensive assessment which includes interviewing (complete subjective history) and an examination of the patient (complete objective examination).

This assignment will take you approximately 2 hours to complete.

In order to use the voice-to-text functionality in Shadow Health (not required) you will need to use the latest Chrome web browser.

You are welcome to revisit your Shadow Health assignment as many times as you like up until the assignment due date deadline; to leave the assignment open, do not click on “Submit” until you are satisfied with your performance.

If you accidentally submit your assignment and would like to revisit it, contact the Shadow Health support team (see below). The assignment cannot be reopened after the assignment due date.

Complete self-reflection prompts to help you think more deeply about your performance in the assignment. Reflective writing develops your clinical reasoning skills as you grow and improve as a clinician and gives your instructor insight into your learning process. The more detail and depth you provide in your responses, the more you will benefit from this activity.

This assignment is to be completed in Shadow Health. Even though your activity and responses will be recorded in Shadow Health, in Blackboard click on the assignment name above, select the Write Submission option, type the word “Confirmed” and then click Submit to save.

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Case Study: Senior Retirement Community.

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Case Study: Senior Retirement Community.

Case Study: Senior Retirement Community.

Question 19 options:

Dedicating the spare bedroom in the home to the family member

A house at a senior retirement community.

A “granny” apartment in a separate part of the house.

Private room at a residential care facility.

Question 20 (5 points) Question 20 Unsaved

An older resident of a long-term care facility diagnosed with dementia has in the last 48 hours become more confused than usual and while usually requiring help with toileting has been incontinent of urine. The client’s healthcare provider orders a complete blood count and serum electrolytes. When the lab tests are all within normal limits the nurse initially:

Question 20 options:

Attributes the changes in the resident’s functioning to advancing dementia.

Suggests that the resident be placed on broad-spectrum antibiotics to prevent infections.

Speaks with the healthcare provider regarding the changes in the client’s function and the possibility of obtaiing a urine culture.

Changes the plan of care to include bladder training and implement a 24-hour calorie count.

Question 21 (5 points) Question 21 Unsaved

An 81-year-old patient is being discharged from the hospital to home. She is on seven different medications, which are to be taken at four different times during the day. What would be most useful in helping this patient manage her medications? The nurse makes the greatest impact on the safe management of an 81-year-old client’s medication administration when included in discharge education is:

Question 21 options:

The package inserts from all of the medications for the client to read.

A pillbox with compartments for each day and each of the doses.

A written list of all the client’s medications and administration routine.

A suggestion that the client’s daughter administer the medications.

Question 22 (5 points) Question 22 Unsaved

A 78-year-old is admitted to the long-term care facility after a hospitalization for pneumonia. The client has a history of a right cerebrovascular accident and dysphagia. When preparing the room for this patient, what equipment is most important in the care of this patient?

Question 22 options:

A room located within sight of the nursing station

An adjustable height bed that goes low to the floor

A suction machine

Oxygen at bedside

Question 23 (5 points) Question 23 Unsaved

The nurse is managing the care of an older client experiencing the symptoms of heat fatigue. Which intervention will the nurse implement to help resolve the condition? Select all that apply.

Question 23 options:

Helping the client assume a comfortable resting position.

Monitoring the client’s intake of electrolyte replacement fluids.

Withholding the client’s prescribed antidiuretic medication.

Documenting that the client’s skin remains pale, moist and cool.

Keeping the environmental humidity low and temperature cool.

Question 24 (5 points) Question 24 Unsaved

Based on recent studies, which statement regarding touch and touch zones is most accurate?

Question 24 options:

Persons age 66 to 100 are the most often touched.

Newly graduated nurses tend to touch clients less often than do nursing students.

When performing peri-care the nurse is working within the zone of intimacy.

The comfort of touch depends on place, situation, social status, and age.

Question 25 (5 points) Question 25 Unsaved

Based on current demographic data, which statement identifies a predictive trend regarding the health care needs of society?

Question 25 options:

There will be an increasing need for health programs for older males.

More nursing services will be required to serve the needs of the population 85 years of age and older.

Fewer nurses will be needed to care for the older, especially in long-term care facilities.

North Dakota is likely to experience the greatest need for gerontological nurses.

Question 26 (5 points) Question 26 Unsaved

Which intervention to manage wandering in clients in a long-term care facility should be implemented? Select all that apply.

Question 26 options:

Camouflaging doorways.

Close observation to identify the person’s individual patterns.

Engaging the person in social interactions.

Using physical restraints to prevent wandering to maintain safety.

Providing enclosed pathways for walking.

Question 27 (5 points) Question 27 Unsaved

When using the Fulmer SPICES assessment tool the nurse expects to ask:

Question 27 options:

“Do you think that you sleep well?”

“Are you ever incontinent of urine?”

“When was the last time you fell?”

“Who helps you when you can’t do something by yourself?”

Question 28 (5 points) Question 28 Unsaved

A woman is terminally ill. Although it has never been discussed in the family nor stated outright by her physician, she suspects that she will die because of her illness. Upon which concept will the nurse base therapeutic intervention on?

Question 28 options:

Closed awareness.

Suspected awareness.

Mutual pretense.

Mutual pretense.

Question 29 (5 points) Question 29 Unsaved

When an older adult client is diagnosed with restless leg syndrome (RLS), the nurse is confident that client education on the condition’s contributing factors has been effective when the client states:

Question 29 options:

“A warm bath at night instead of in the morning is my new routine.”

“Eating a banana at breakfast assures me the potassium I need.”

“I’ve cut way back on my caffeinated coffee, teas and sodas.”

“I elevate my legs on a pillow so as to improve circulation.”

Question 30 (5 points) Question 30 Unsaved

State Death with Dignity Laws require that the terminally ill client be:

Question 30 options:

Educated regarding treatment alternatives.

Over the age of 55.

Be supported in their decision by immediate family members.

Eligible for federal support services.

Question 31 (5 points) Question 31 Unsaved

Serious and well controlled research studies on aging have been available:

Question 31 options:

Only in the past 50 years

Since the turn of the 20th century

Following the Great Depression

Since the year 2000

Question 32 (5 points) Question 32 Unsaved

Which activity would a couple in the reorientation phase of their retirement engage in?

Question 32 options:

Establishing a new budget that will allow them to travel to see the grandchildren.

Reading magazines devoted to making decisions about retirement plans.

Looking for ways to ‘fill up the days.’

Volunteering at the local animal shelter.

Question 33 (5 points) Question 33 Unsaved

What factor is an important contribution to polypharmacy in older adults?

Question 33 options:

Inadequate communication among medical care providers.

Implementation of Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit.

Use of generic medications.

Increasing popularity of dietary and herbal supplements.

Question 34 (5 points) Question 34 Unsaved

Which is the most likely reason that Type 2 diabetes mellitus is often difficult to diagnose in older adults?

Question 34 options:

Presenting symptoms occur very quickly.

The disease rarely occurs in older adults.

The classic symptoms may not be present in older adults.

There are no recognizable symptoms; it is a “silent killer.”

Question 35 (5 points) Question 35 Unsaved

An older client in a long-term care facility is receiving an annual physical and is ordered laboratory tests that include a complete blood count, serum electrolytes, and thyroid tests. When the client’s son questions why these tests are being ordered by saying, “Dad is 85 and supposed to be sleepy,” the nurse’s response is based on an understanding that:

Question 35 options:

The healthcare provider ordering the tests needs to explain the rationale to the son.

When conducted annually, all of the tests are helpful in promoting maximum health for older adults in the long-term care setting.

The tests are useful, but only if clinically indicated.

The complete blood count and serum electrolytes are useful screening tests, but the usefulness of the thyroid test should be questioned.

Question 36 (5 points) Question 36 Unsaved

Which reaction to the loss of a spouse or long-term partner is a unique example of older adult male bereavement?

Question 36 options:

Withdrawing from friends and family.

Remarrying within months of the loss.

Focusing on ‘doing’ rather than ‘feeling.’

Experiencing moderate to severe depression.

Question 37 (5 points) Question 37 Unsaved

It is imperative that nursing take a leadership role in providing effective health care across the lifespan and in various health care settings. Which intervention will have the greatest impact on achieving positive outcomes concerning that issue?

Question 37 options:

An acute care facility providing continuing education credits for geriatric nursing in-services.

A baccalaureate degree nursing program including a geriatric care course into the curriculum.

A professional nursing organization provides advanced practice status as a geriatric specialist.

A long-term care facility’s nursing director is a certified geriatric nurse practitioner.

Question 38 (5 points) Question 38 Unsaved

In order to focus on the older population with the greatest risk for suicide the nurse would conduct a depression screening that targets:

Question 38 options:

African-American men.

White men.

White women.

African-American women.

Question 39 (5 points) Question 39 Unsaved

Which outcome regarding the effects of touch on the skin is not supported by current research?

Question 39 options:

Brings about sensory stimulation.

Help relieves physical and psychosocial pain.

Known to reduce anxiety and tension.

Improves skin integrity.

Question 40 (5 points) Question 40 Unsaved

The nurse is caring for a client with a newly diagnosed chronic illness. In answering the client’s questions, the nurse most accurately responds when basing the response on the fact that:

Question 40 options:

The most prevalent form of disease in older adults at this time is acute illness.

Although chronic illness lasts a long time, the condition primarily affects the client.

Chronic illness is lifelong, and coping can be influenced by perceived uncertainty.

The client’s acquisition of knowledge of the disease will guarantee successful coping.

Question 41 (5 points) Question 41 Unsaved

What research finding is the basis for care planning of the client receiving palliative care?

Question 41 options:

Palliative care is most useful when implement in the last 6 months of life.

Pain management is inadequately addressed among the terminally ill population.

Palliative care is only offered to patients whose deaths are imminent.

Resuscitation in the case of a cardiac or respiratory arrest is not implemented.

Question 42 (5 points) Question 42 Unsaved

When working with a bereaved individual, the goal of nursing interventions is to:

Question 42 options:

Assist the individual to go through the stages of grief work in the optimal order.

Assist the individual to attain a healthy adjustment to the loss experience.

Encourage the individual to talk about his or her feelings about the deceased individual.

Offer support and advice about how to successfully achieve grief work.

Question 43 (5 points) Question 43 Unsaved

Which information will the nurse manager include when discussing the major differentiation between delirium and dementia with novice nurses: Select all that apply.

Question 43 options:

The delirious client learns to make up answers to hide their confusion.

Delirium requires increased monitoring at night.

The client diagnosed with dementia generally looks frightened.

Dementia results in a steady decline in cognitive abilities.

Delirium is characterized by fluctuations in alertness.

Question 44 (5 points) Question 44 Unsaved

The nurse is facilitating a support group for older adults who have recently experienced losses in their lives. What is the basis for the nurse’s understanding of how the individual participants will display stress?

Question 44 options:

An individual’s age has the most influence on the amount of stress they will experience.

Stress tolerance is fairly consistent in both males and females.

Stress is a natural occurrence to loss and is always manifested in physical signs.

There are individual differences in how in how individuals define, perceive, and react to stress.

Question 45 (5 points) Question 45 Unsaved

The Beers list is an effective tool for healthcare professionals prescribing and/or managing the medication therapy of older adults since it identifies medications that for this population:

Question 45 options:

Are not typically covered by drug benefit plans.

Have a higher than usual risk for injury.

Are likely to be abused

Generally cause allergic reactions.

Question 46 (5 points) Question 46 Unsaved

An older client admitted to the hospital after having sustained a fall at home is diagnosed with a right hip fracture and experienced a surgical reduction of the fracture. At 2:30 AM, she awakens from sleep insisting that her daughter is in the other room and wants to see her. Attempts to reorient her to the surroundings are unsuccessful. In reviewing the client’s record, what data would be considered a primary risk factor for the delirium?

Question 46 options:

History of dementia.

Death of the client’s husband last month.

The client’s age.

History of cardiac disease.

Case Study: Senior Retirement Community.

Case Study: Senior Retirement Community.

Case Study: Senior Retirement Community.

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